OFNP vs. OFNR

Fiber optic cables are a vital component of modern communication networks. They are used to transmit data over long distances with minimal signal loss and interference. Two common types of fiber optic cables are OFNP (plenum) and OFNR (riser). Understanding the differences between these two types of fiber optic cables is crucial in making the right choice for your communication network.

OFNP (Optical Fiber Non-conductive Plenum) cables are used in air-handling spaces and plenum areas in buildings. Plenum areas are those spaces that allow air circulation for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. OFNP cables are made of fire-resistant materials and are required to meet strict fire safety codes. They emit low levels of smoke and toxic fumes, making them suitable for use in areas where smoke and toxic fumes could be dangerous in the event of a fire.

OFNR (Optical Fiber Non-conductive Riser) cables, on the other hand, are used in vertical risers or pathways in buildings. They do not emit low levels of smoke and toxic fumes and are not required to meet the strict fire safety codes of OFNP cables. OFNR cables are less expensive than OFNP cables and are typically used in non-critical areas where fire safety is not a major concern.

When it comes to transmission performance, they are identical. They both offer high bandwidth and low signal loss, making them ideal for transmitting large amounts of data over long distances. However, OFNP cables are typically more expensive than OFNR due to the compounds used in the manufacturing process for the outer jacket. 

In conclusion, the choice between OFNP and OFNR fiber optic cables depends on the specific requirements of your communication network. OFNP cables are ideal for use in air handling spaces and plenum areas where fire safety is a concern, while OFNR cables are suitable for use in non-critical areas where fire safety is not a major concern. OFNP cables can always be used in place of OFNR, but not vice versa. 

Different types of optical fiber cables exist for various fire ratings, which can make choosing the appropriate one a challenging task. To aid those who are planning or installing a fiber network, UL 1651 is a critical guideline for ensuring the correct selection of fiber. The National Electric Code (NEC) Article 770.19 outlines these guidelines, but some commonly used measures include:

  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR,OFNG, OFCG, OFN, OFC for small, in-building deployments using a riser
  • OFNP, OFCP for existing fabricated ducts within a building
  • OFNP, OFCP for plenum spaces used for environmental air in public buildings
  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR,OFNG, OFCG, OFN, OFC for fireproof shafts using a riser in any building type
  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR,OFNG, OFCG, OFN, OFC when using a metal raceway for in-building deployments covering multiple floors and rooms/apartments
  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR for vertical runs between floors within a riser
  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR for riser cable routing assemblies inside a building
  • OFNP, OFCP, OFNR, OFCR,OFNG, OFCG, OFN, OFC for in-building deployments with routing on only one floor.

Consult DMSI For Your Fiber Optic Needs

We focus on custom product manufacturing for fiber optic connectivity. We will engineer solutions to any customer’s specs and needs, and we create end-to-end solutions so you won’t be left in the dark. DMSI strives to provide our customers with the highest quality product above industry standards at a lower cost.

Do you need a custom fiber optic connectivity solution?

DMSI is ready to work with you to customize your fiber optic network!

We focus on custom product manufacturing for fiber optic connectivity. We will engineer solutions to any customer’s specs and needs, and we create end-to-end solutions so you won’t be left in the dark. DMSI strives to provide our customers with the highest quality product above industry standards at a competitive cost.

Do you need a custom fiber optic connectivity solution? DMSI specializes in custom design solutions. We work all over the world to provide solutions from our headquarters in Venice, Florida. Our goal is to provide you with the perfect solutions, designs, and cabling.

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OFNR vs. OFNP

Cable jackets are comprised of different materials based on different applications. Plastics used in the structure of plenum cable in the United States are regulated under the National Fire Protection Association standard NFPA 90A: Standard for the Installation of Air Conditioning and Ventilating Systems. All materials planned for use on wire and cables to be placed in plenum spaces are intended to meet rigorous fire safety test standards by NFPA 262 and outlined in NFPA 90A.

OFNR (Optical Fiber Non-conductive Riser)

Used in riser applications or spaces inside a building in pathways that pass between floors, such as a vertical zone or space. They are engineered to prevent a fire from spreading from floor to floor within buildings. OFNR cable is resistant to oxidation and degradation. It gives off heavy black smoke, hydrochloric acid, and other toxic gases when it burns. It is fine to use as a patch cord or for single in-wall runs. If you want to use it in a building, the building must feature a contained ventilation system and have good fire exits.

OFNP (Optical Fiber Non-conductive Plenum)

Used in plenum applications or inside buildings in plenum areas, the areas between a ceiling and the floor above it, where space is reserved for the circulation of air. They have the highest rated fire retardant which emits little smoke during combustion. The non-conductive element within OFNP means they contain no electrically conductive components. OFNP cable has fire resistance and gives low smoke when it burns. It can be used as a substitute for PVC (OFNR) cable since its fire resistance is the highest. It’s designed for the movement of environmental air and is commonly used for vertical runs between floors.

DMSI utilizes UL-listed cables in all our products. UL-listed cables are fully traceable and guarantee high quality and safe product. To combat counterfeit offshore cables, we recommend asking your suppliers for a certificate of compliance, or proof of where your product is coming from.

Consult DMSI For Your Fiber Optic Needs

We focus on custom product manufacturing for fiber optic connectivity. We will engineer solutions to any customer’s specs and needs, and we create end-to-end solutions so you won’t be left in the dark. DMSI strives to provide our customers with the highest quality product above industry standards at a lower cost.

Do you need a custom fiber optic connectivity solution?

DMSI is ready to work with you to customize your fiber optic network!

We focus on custom product manufacturing for fiber optic connectivity. We will engineer solutions to any customer’s specs and needs, and we create end-to-end solutions so you won’t be left in the dark. DMSI strives to provide our customers with the highest quality product above industry standards at a competitive cost.

Do you need a custom fiber optic connectivity solution? DMSI specializes in custom design solutions. We work all over the world to provide solutions from our headquarters in Venice, Florida. Our goal is to provide you with the perfect solutions, designs, and cabling.

Follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn for more updates on our business and related cabling information.

All About Fiber Optic Cables and Their Fire Ratings

Fiber optic cables severely reduce the risk of electrical fires in comparison to copper cables. Because they transfer information using light, they don’t cause electromagnetic interference, either. But, of course, there is always a
risk of fire anywhere fiber optic cables are installed, due to other factors. And, when this happens, fiber optic cables have different levels of resistance. This is where fire ratings for cables come in. An important part of understanding the functionality of a fiber optic cable is learning about fire ratings–for a basic overview, read on.

Why are fire ratings needed?

If fiber optic cables reduce the risk of fire, why are ratings even necessary? While fiber optic cables utilize light to transfer information, some cables contain conductive material that can conduct electricity. This is where the risk of fire comes in, and where the National Electric Code (NEC) creates different ratings per cable. Depending on where the cables are needed, fire ratings should be heavily considered, as some purposes are more of a fire hazard than others. Usually, the ratings are displayed on the cable jacket every 2 to 4 feet.

What affects the ratings?

There are three types of jacket ratings: plenum, riser, and general purpose. Plenum jackets are considered the most resistant to fire, whereas general purpose jackets are least resistant. Certain jackets need to be used in certain situations; for more information, you can view article 770.19 of the NEC. But, there’s another factor to consider when defining fire ratings, and that’s whether or not the cable is conductive. Again, this can affect where the cable must be used–it’s important to contact professionals when installing fiber optic cable networks for this reason. Fire ratings must be carefully evaluated and considered before the cables are installed.

DMSI has the professionals you need in order to install your fiber optic cable network!

DMSI is ready to work with you to customize your fiber optic network!

We focus on custom product manufacturing for fiber optic connectivity. We will engineer solutions to any customer’s specs and needs, and we create end-to-end solutions so you won’t be left in the dark. DMSI strives to provide our customers with the highest quality product above industry standards at a competitive cost.

Do you need a custom fiber optic connectivity solution? DMSI specializes in custom design solutions. We work all over the world to provide solutions from our headquarters in Venice, Florida. Our goal is to provide you with the perfect solutions, designs, and cabling.

Follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn for more updates on our business and related cabling information.